Week in Review: A Landmark Anniversary for Free Speech

One year ago this week, the Supreme Court restored the First Amendment rights of millions of public-sector workers, ruling in Janus v. AFSCME that governments can’t force their employees to pay fees to a union just to keep their jobs. That decision has already had a big impact: a lot of money that otherwise would have gone toward unions’ political advocacy—perhaps hundreds of millions of dollars in the past year alone—is instead going into the pockets of workers who are free to spend it as they see fit. But Janus could have even greater effects in the years ahead, as litigators for liberty at the Goldwater Institute and like-minded organizations across the country work to build on the Suprem

Week in Review: States Should Take the Lead in Protecting Free Speech on Campus

Nowhere in the United States do individuals struggle more to listen and be heard than on college campuses. As Goldwater Institute Senior Fellow Jonathan Butcher explains this week in the Daily Caller, Alabama lawmakers seem to agree with this: Recently, Governor Kay Ivey signed bipartisan legislation to protect free speech at public universities. Now, he writes, other states should follow suit and move forward with protecting speech on college campuses. “If university administrators do not create a learning environment that allows students and educators to pursue truth, then college governing boards and state lawmakers must develop specific proposals to do so,” Butcher writes. “State lawmake

States Should Take the Lead in Protecting Free Speech on Campus

Nowhere in the U.S. do individuals struggle more to listen and be heard than on college campuses. Alabama lawmakers appear to agree. Earlier this month, Gov. Kay Ivey signed bipartisan legislation to protect free speech at public universities. Threats to free expression exist at institutions of higher education around the country, and Alabama is no exception. Young America’s Foundation and the Alliance Defending Freedom wrote the University of Alabama a letter in 2017 decrying the school’s policy for handing out literature on campus. Last fall, the College Media Association censured the University of North Alabama (UNA) for withholding records from the student newspaper. The Foundation for I

Week in Review – Our Post-Janus Lawsuit: Free Speech Applies to Everyone

The First Amendment protects our freedom to speak—as well as our freedom not to speak. When we’re forced to support causes with which we disagree, our free-speech rights are undermined. All Americans should enjoy the freedom of speech, and that’s why the Goldwater Institute is fighting for those rights in court. In last year’s Janus decision, the U.S. Supreme Court decided that public employees should not have to join and pay dues to a union, since unions used those funds for advocate for political issues that a public employee might not agree with. Now, the issue of employees’ free-speech rights is back in court: North Dakota attorney Arnold Fleck was forced to join the state bar associatio

Week in Review: Alabama Protects Free Speech on Campus

Alabama has enacted a new law to protect free speech on campus, adding protections to the expressive rights of students, faculty, and other officials at the state’s colleges. Under Alabama’s law, which Governor Kay Iveysigned on Thursday,public institutions must consider sanctions for anyone in the campus community that violates someone else’s expressive activity; abolish so-called “free-speech zones” that limit speech to isolated areas of campus; and require university trustees to report annually on free-speech incidents, to name a few provisions. Alabama’s law follows the sound design of similar protections adopted in North Carolina, Arizona, Georgia, and by the University of Wisconsin Boa

Alabama’s Campus Free Speech Firestorm Leads to Legislative Action

Scott Morris says he was always just “one infuriated administrator away” from losing his job. Morris, advisor to the Flor-Ala, the University of North Alabama’s (UNA) student newspaper, helped student journalists complete a records request last year and found his infuriated college official. As the Flor-Ala saga unfolds, Alabama lawmakers have sent Gov. Kay Ivey a proposal to protect free speech on campus that adds protections to the expressive rights of students, faculty, and other college officials at UNA and other state colleges. The timing of the Flor-Ala events and the legislative proposal is more coincidental that causational, though free-speech incidents are so prevalent on campuses a

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